Genealogy in Baucina

If you search your ancestors in Baucina , Palermo Sicily in Italy you can find birth records , marriage and death records at Registrar of Vital Statistics in the City Office of Baucina or in the parishes archives of the town.

If your goal is family history, you need to know that registry offices in Baucina, as in Palermo province, were established around 1820: it means that you could find records in Baucina registrar archives as of that date. If you want to go beyond, you should consider to investigate the parish records (usually in Sicily religious records started about mid 1500).

In case you are interested in dual italian citizenship, you must ask for birth certificates to the town hall. Copies of birth records are NOT valid to apply for italian dual citizenship.

Before to start your genealogy research in Baucina, we suggest you to read our tips for your search . They are useful to search in Sicilia and in Baucina too.

Next picture shows the demographic trends in Baucina from the Italian Unification (1861) an important info to understand how many people lived there in the past.



It could be important to know if the last name you are investigating is a frequent surname in Baucina. As more your surname is common in Baucina, as more it could be difficult to find the exact family branches in Baucina archives if you have not exact dates.

It could be useful for you to know that some of the most common surnames in Palermo province are:
Aiello, Amato, Barone, Battaglia, Bruno, Caruso, Catalano, Costa, Cusimano, D’Amico, D’Angelo, Di Maggio, Di Salvo, Ferrante, Ferrara, Gambino, Geraci, Giordano, Greco, La Barbera, La Rosa, Lo Cascio, Lombardo, Macaluso, Mancuso, Maniscalco, Mannino, Marchese, Marino, Martorana, Mazzola, Messina, Mineo, Orlando, Palazzolo, Parisi, Pecoraro, Piazza, Randazzo, Rizzo, Romano, Russo, Sciortino, Siragusa, Taormina, Tarantino, Vassallo, Vitale.

Church archives in Baucina and in Palermo province may instead contain even older information, but they are far less accessible from abroad (and almost impossible by email).
Then, parishes send information not easily.

If you have the opportunity to visit Baucina and Palermo province, you could plan to investigate churches’ archives by yourself, but from abroad is very difficult to obtain any result unless you find a reliable local help.
For our experience is better to start to search months before your arrival: in this way you will avoid to waste time in the offices and with italian bureaucracy and you will have more free time to visit the town and surroundings on your ancestors footsteps.

Another important source of information is the “Archivio di Stato” (National archive) in Palermo.
You can reach it here:
Archivio di Stato di Palermo

Address: Via Vittorio Emanuele, 31 – Palermo
Phone: +39 0912704001 .002 .003
Days and opening hours: monday – friday 08:00 – 18:00 saturday 08:00 – 13:30 weekly closing: Sunday and holidays; no reservation
;


In any case, never give up! Probably the distance from your country and Italy, some difficulties in understanding and in translation, could complicate your search but this should not discourage you.

If you want to discuss with other people interested in genealogy research in Baucina, or if you have questions regarding your family in Baucina, just leave a message below in the comment area

If your research is in a dead end and you need professional help from our local Italian genealogists write to baucina@italianside.com our expert in Baucina area will study your request and we will reply to you with a research plan and a quote.

10 Comments

  1. Rosemary says:

    Hello,
    My grandparents were born in Baucina around 1890. Their names were Francesco Varisco and Fortunata LiCausi.
    I have been trying to find out if I still have relatives in Baucina. I plan to visit in a few years and would love to reconnect.
    My great grandfathers mother was Anna Porrazzo. She married Antonio Varisco around 1850. They has a son, my Great Grandfather. His name was Francesco was born in 1864.
    Thanks.
    Rosemary

  2. Stephanie says:

    Hello,
    I’m researching my ancestors from Baucina and cannot find anything in regards to Ciro Guardia, born around 1795, he was married to Giovanna Baubiera and had a son, Vincenzo born 1819 in Baucina. Vincenzo’s children came to America around the 1890’s – Ciro, Giovannina, Salvatore, Maria, Antonia . Another daughter, Francesca married Antonio Diliberto in 1889 and I cannot find any other trace of her…Ciro married Antonia LiCausi, daughter of Francesco and Caterina Aleotta. If anyone is related to the Guardia’s or Licausi’s please contact me. thanks! Stephanie

  3. Rosemarie says:

    I am planning to visit Baucina next summer. My grandparents, Rose and Antonio LaBarbera came to the U.S before or during 1895. Can you advise me as to where (in the town) I should begin my search for information? Thank you

    • Joseph says:

      My ancestor who came to America was born in Baucino. Antonino Lababera, son of Nicholas Labarbera. Antonino became a carabinieri and married Angela scafidi from Bel Monte Mazzagna

  4. Frank says:

    Looking to see if D’Ippolito is a common name in Baucina. My great grandfather (Salvatore) emigrated to New York in 1890. I believe he was born to Nicolo D’Ippolito and Concettina Marcello, in Baucina, on December 30, 1876.

    • Keith says:

      Frank, My 2x’s great grandmother was LEonarda D’Ippolito, from BAucina also. She was born there in 1852. HEr father was Antonino also. Wonder if there was any relation. KEith

      • Marianna says:

        I am intrigued to find my family’s name here. My mother, Fortunata Ann Dippolito LiMandri’s parents immigrated from Baucina. My Grandfather, Salvatore Charles Dippolito born in 1889, to Guiseppi D’Ippolito and Grazia Barbaci, immigrated around 1903. My grandmother, Leonarda Angelina Neglia was born in 1898. Her parents were Joseph Neglia and Leonarda Campanella. Other relatives from Baucina are LaBarbara and Castelano and Frumifredo. Other family members DiCarlo, Mineo, Pecoraro, LiMandri came from nearby towns.

  5. francesca says:

    traveling to Palermo in the fall and I want to see the street my dad was born at. His last name is laBarbera. How doo i start to find info???

  6. G says:

    Hi – I have little to offer in your quest. In the 1980s my mother, now 88, went to Baucina and hired a translator. Her parents immigrated before 1920 from Baucina. Her family’s name was Pittala. Apparently they were the major land lords of Baucina in the 19th century. None of that “land wealth” made it to the U.S. In fact, as a result of some ” Toto, we’re not in Sicily any more” indiscretion, a grand father found himself in a marriage that ended in divorce that ended the ability of any heirs to inherit anything from Italy. My Mother came back with death masks of her ancestors.

  7. Patricia says:

    Hello,
    My grandparents were born in Baucina in the late 1800’s. They moved to America in the 1920’s ( I believe my Grandfather came a little earlier) . I’m trying to get more information on their parents. My grandmother was Rosina Brucato I believe her parents were Antonio and Lucia Brucato.
    My Grandmother ( Rosina) was the only one in her family that moved to America, she had two sisters (Antonina and Pasqualina which I met in 1977 they are now deceased, and they had no children) Also two brothers ( who also had no children) I cannot remember Pasqualina’s married name, her husband’s name was Andrea . Antonina was married to Georgio Nicotra and he has a brother still living in Baucina name Salvatore. I believe Salvatore inherited the property of Antonina and Georgio . I believe this property was originally in the Brucato family or the LaMendola family. But, I am not certain.
    My Grandfather was Nunzio LaMendola and I believe his parents names were Camillo and Simona LaMendola. Nunzio had several siblings, and they all moved to the USA. I went to the Town Hall in Baucina, and they looked in a book for me with a list of “births” I believe, but it was not helpful., probably because my Italian is not very good, in fact its Bad !
    How would you suggest I proceed. Thank you. Grazia.

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