All Posts from ItalianSide

Would you Like a Little Grated Wood on your Pasta, Ma’am?

Most of us know that the grated Parmesan cheese sitting on the supermarket shelf or on the table of your local pizzeria is not the stuff that culinary dreams are made of. For grated cheese to be able to sit for months on a store shelf, it must contain preservatives and an anti-clumping agent. Powdered cellulose, the additive of choice, is made by... [Read more]


What A Birth Record Looks Like What A Birth Record Looks Like

Many readers ask us what kind of info are available on the Italian Civil Records. This is a sample of a birth record issued in Italy during last decades of 1800. Going back in time the form is different, in the first years of 1800 it was just hand written. As you can see there are many useful information about our ancestors! We numbered the main info... [Read more]


Rocco’s Store Rocco’s Store

ItalianSide and master artist Rocco Persia are happy to present a truly distinctive work of art that can be customized to celebrate your family history. On a background with a town, ship or flags, you can add figures that represent your ancestors’ emigration from Italy to their adopted country. What a perfect gift it would make for your... [Read more]


NY Loves Moliterno! NY Loves Moliterno!

We just received this message from our friend Camille Di Trani. In the past weeks we helped Camille to find her Italian roots. Without the birth town of her family it was really as difficult as to search a needle in a haystack. But our great (professional) genealogists were able to solve this mistery: Camille’s ancestors were from Moliterno (Potenza... [Read more]


Honoring a family: Italian Roots in Ripacandida

Would you like to share your family memories on ItalianSide? Write to stories@italianside.com. We just received this story from Linda Hoffman. We helped Linda to know more about her family in Ripacandida (Potenza). Here is my story. I never knew my grandparents, they passed away before I was born, but I grew up in a huge Italian family. My mother... [Read more]


Sailing to Palermo (part 2)

by Mark Russell First part is here But what truly confirms Palermo’s significance as a city of international art-historical importance is its Norman architecture. The Normans came to Sicily in the eleventh century and their architectural achievements are dotted around the city. San Cataldo, the church of La Magione, and San Giovanni degli... [Read more]


Sailing to Palermo (part 1) Sailing to Palermo (part 1)

by Mark Russell It is eight o’clock in the evening and the nightly ferry from Naples to Palermo is preparing to sail. Vesuvius looms hazily in the fading light across the bay. Soon we will be travelling across the storied waters of the Tyrrhenian Sea. This is an exciting prospect in itself. But for the moment, my eyes are fixed on the view,... [Read more]


Ancestry Tour in Calabritto tracks the Mattia family roots. Ancestry Tour in Calabritto tracks the Mattia family roots.

While planning a trip to Sorrento with my wife, I knew that I would be only about a 1.5 hour drive from the town of my ancestors, Calabritto. This small town in the mountains, inland from Salerno and Naples, is where my great grandfather and grandmother were born and got married before they emigrated to the U.S. in 1892 (she was pregnant with my... [Read more]


Another “Back to your Roots” Tour, Another Happy Friend of ItalianSide Another “Back to your Roots” Tour, Another Happy Friend of ItalianSide

An Ancestry tour sheds light on Maryann’s family I decided I wanted to visit the little town where my maternal grandparents came from. I knew a little and had some nearly 100 year old documents. I was having difficulty trying to trace anything and I came upon Italianside.com. This site is chock full of information and I sent them an inquiry. Shortly... [Read more]


“Biggia-dutz” ! “Biggia-dutz” !

What do you recall about growing up Italian? Share one of your childhood memories with us. Our Grandmas often relied on memory when cooking dishes whose recipes had been handed down for generations. When they couldn’t find exactly what they needed in their adopted country, they made do by substituting one ingredient for another. Recipes evolved... [Read more]


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